12 Resources To Improve Your Writing

Being able to sit down and write at a high volume while producing a product that is both entertaining and full of quality content is an incredibly difficult task.

For the most part, this requires a combination of time, dedication, a solid grasp of the English (or whatever language you are using) language, and a creative mind that is capable of expanding its boundaries and pushing past limitations. However, it also helps to continue to build on your education and understanding of your craft as well. In a recent post in these regards, Josh Steimle has provided us with 12 resources that can help craft a written work that will sell, time and time again.

He refers to this as a perennial seller that can continue to provide passive income long after it is complete. If you are considering a life as an author, perhaps these 12 books can be of use to you on this journey.


On the New York Times website is a page explaining how they choose the books that gain a spot on the coveted New York Times Bestseller list. Towards the end of the page you’ll find this paragraph:

Among the categories not actively tracked at this time are: perennial sellers, required classroom reading, textbooks, reference and test preparation guides, e-books available exclusively from a single vendor, journals, workbooks, calorie counters, shopping guides, periodicals and crossword puzzles.

It was the term “perennial seller” that leaped out at author Ryan Holiday and inspired him to write his book Perennial Seller, which explains how to write a book that will stand the test of time and sell better a decade from now than it does today. Below are 12 books that are themselves perennial sellers, and which will help you to craft your own perennial seller.

PERENNIAL SELLER BY RYAN HOLIDAY

It only makes sense to start with the book that made the term famous. In case you’re not familiar with Holiday, he’s the author of perennial sellers (that are also bestsellers) like The Obstacle is the WayEgo is the Enemy, and Stillness is the Key. They’re all worth reading, and if you need some help with marketing and PR, his books Growth Hacker Marketing and Trust Me, I’m Lying are excellent reads as well.

ON WRITING WELL BY WILLIAM ZINSSER

I’m re-reading this right now and it is sooo good. Perhaps one of the most practical and useful books about how to write non-fiction well. If you only buy one of the books from this list, buy On Writing Well.

EVERYBODY WRITES BY ANN HANDLEY

Handley’s book gives you permission to write the way that’s comfortable for you, while simultaneously helping you become a better writer. Everybody Writes is about all writing, not just writing books, but it will definitely help you write a better book.

WRITING DOWN THE BONES BY NATALIE GOLDBERG

Less is more. Take it from one of my favorite authors, Robert Pirsig, who praises Writing Down the Bones like this, “The secret of creativity, Natalie Goldberg makes clear, is to subtract rules for writing, not add them. It’s a process of ‘uneducation’ rather than education. Proof that she knows what she’s talking about is abundant in her own sentences. They flow with speed and grace and accuracy and simplicity. It looks easy to a reader, but writers know it is the hardest writing of all.”

STEAL LIKE AN ARTIST BY AUSTIN KLEON

This is a short book with lots of pictures. You can read it in 30 minutes, but you won’t, because you’ll be taking so many notes. Steal Like An Artist will break down your writer’s block.

BIRD BY BIRD BY ANNE LAMOTT

Bird by Bird will help you write a better book whether you’re writing about birds or anything else. Practical tips from how to get started to what it’s like to be an author.

ON WRITING BY STEPHEN KING

I don’t like any of King’s books except for On Writing. Half autobiography, half writing tips. The details of King’s life are fascinating and I couldn’t help but like him by the end, despite how I feel about his horror-genre books and his political views. The writing tips are a treasure of wisdom for all authors. Skip the biographical part if you must, but read the tips.

REAL ARTISTS DON’T STARVE BY JEFF GOINS

Focused as much on creativity as on writing, Real Artists Don’t Starve is the book to read when you start wondering if being an author is really for you. It will get you excited to keep going, and to create better art.

THE SCRIBE METHOD BY TUCKER MAX

Max is a sleazebag-turned-respectable-family-man. While you may not like his earlier books (they’re popular amongst prison inmates and young males in the military if that gives you any insights into the dubious redeeming qualities of his bestseller I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell), The Scribe Method is pure gold. Max not only has multiple New York Times bestsellers to his name, but runs a company that has helped thousands of authors publish non-fiction books, some of which have sold millions of copies.

BUILDING A STORYBRAND BY DONALD MILLER

Building a StoryBrand isn’t about writing, it’s about telling stories and how stories capture our attention. If you want people to stay engaged while reading your book and remember it, tell stories. Zinsser says the same in On Writing Well.

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE BY STRUNK AND WHITE

If the title The Elements of Style doesn’t sound exciting, how about the authors’ names? Sounds like a business partnership from a movie set in the 1920s. Regardless,

THE WAR OF ART BY STEVEN PRESSFIELD

Some people love this book and others hate it. Just go read the Amazon reviews and you’ll see what I mean. I liked it. I think you’ll like The War of Art but if you don’t tell me why not in the comments below.


Life is Strange. Live it Well.

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